Brazil: Stray Bullets Are No Accident / Robert Muggah

Thirty-two bullets. That’s all it took to shatter the lives of just as many innocent men, women and children in metropolitan Rio de Janeiro last month. It is an unspeakable tragedy. The victims consist of toddlers and senior citizens — all of them going about their own business. Most of them are residents of low-income neighborhoods, especially the city’s sprawling north zone.

The blame game is in full swing. The state’s Secretary for Public Security has condemned drug trafficking groups, alluding to a “nation of criminals” with brazen disregard for human life. Meanwhile, human rights activists say that the military police are also to blame. Caught in the crossfire, locals are throwing up their hands in resignation. Yet there is nothing accidental about these incidents — they are indicative of a failure of public policy. SEE MORE…

Global: Las 50 ciudades más violentas del mundo 2014

Acapulco ocupa el tercer lugar en el ranking global elaborado por la organización Seguridad, Justicia y Paz, los números públicos arrojan una disminución de la violencia en México, sin embargo, los creadores de este organismo advierten que hay riesgos de distorsión de la información.

Ocho ciudades mexicanas figuran en el ranking de las 50 ciudades más violentas del mundo elaborado por la organización Seguridad Justicia y Paz.

Por cuarto año consecutivo, con 1,317 homicidios, la ciudad hondureña de San Pedro Sula ocupó el primer lugar entre las 50 ciudades de más de 300,000 habitantes contabilizadas por la organización.VER MÁS…

Global: Fixing Fragile Cities. Solutions for Urban Violence and Poverty / Robert Muggah

In the decades to come, the city, not the state, will decide stability and development. People around the world have been converging on cities for centuries, and more than half of them live in one today. Western cities have grown so dominant that commentators now speak of “the triumph” of cities and call on mayors to rule the world.

The direction of urban population growth is shifting dramatically, as Africans and Asians, not Americans or Europeans, flock to cities in unprecedented numbers. According to the latest UN estimates, more than 90 percent of all future population growth will occur in the cities and sprawling shantytowns of the developing world. Meanwhile, urban population growth in most developed economies will slow; in some places, it could even shift into reverse. SEE MORE… 

México: Sabio Saviano / Yuriria Sierra

Todas estas drogas, las legales y las ilegales, enferman y pueden matar a las personas que las consumen.

Lo he escrito aquí repetidas veces: necesitamos un debate en serio sobre el alcance que podría tener la legalización de la mariguana. Aunque en realidad, debería ser así para todas las drogas: “Nuestra realidad autoriza, como lo hace con el tabaco o el alcohol, el consumo personal en esas pequeñas dosis, pero, a diferencia de aquellas otras drogas (porque fumar y beber también crean adicción), no tienen un posicionamiento en el mercado de forma legal. No tienen publicidad, no son empresas establecidas, no pagan impuestos. Y, muy importante, no derraman sangre para continuar operando. Todas estas drogas, las legales y las ilegales, enferman y pueden matar a las personas que las consumen. VER MÁS…

Latin America Scores Lowest on Security / Jan Sonnenschein

Venezuelans report lowest security levels worldwide .

Residents of Latin America and the Caribbean were the least likely among all global regions last year to feel secure in their communities. In 2013, the region scored a 56 (on a scale from 0 to 100) on Gallup’s Law and Order Index, which is based on confidence in local police, feelings of personal safety, and self-reported incidence of theft. Residents of Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the U.S. and Canada were the most likely to feel secure. SEE MORE…

Brazil Can Put Safety and Justice at the Heart of Global Development / Robert Muggah

The future of global development policy is being hotly debated in New York over the coming months. Governments from 193 countries are negotiating the form and content of the so-called Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs. These new benchmarks will replace the eight Millennium Development Goals that expire in 2015. Most diplomats agree on the importance of including core development priorities into the future SDGs including ending poverty and hunger, ensuring healthy lives and quality education, and guaranteeing access to water and energy. Many also believe that peace, security and justice, controversial and difficult to measure though they may be, must be explicitly recognized as development priorities in their own right. SEE MORE…

Brazil Can Put Safety and Justice at the Heart of Global Development / Robert Muggah

The future of global development policy is being hotly debated in New York over the coming months. Governments from 193 countries are negotiating the form and content of the so-called Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs. These new benchmarks will replace the eight Millennium Development Goals that expire in 2015. Most diplomats agree on the importance of including core development priorities into the future SDGs including ending poverty and hunger, ensuring healthy lives and quality education, and guaranteeing access to water and energy. Many also believe that peace, security and justice, controversial and difficult to measure though they may be, must be explicitly recognized as development priorities in their own right.

The SDGs are about much more than achieving a diplomatic consensus. Starting next year, they will serve as a road-map for driving development around the world, including the world’s poorest countries. Like the remarkably successful MDGs before them, they will incentivize governments to establish forward-looking benchmarks, monitor progress, and provide critical signals about the health of our planet. They matter fundamentally. And yet the SDGs will stumble if they do not account explicitly for some of the most intractable roadblocks to development, including violence, injustice and corruption.   SEE MORE…

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